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Women's Health

Research is revealing that many diseases and disease treatments affect men and women differently. By understanding the unique aspects of biology and chemistry in women, researchers are identifying more effective treatments for cancers of the breast and reproductive tract and addressing challenges to fertility.

Articles

Hard copies of the Breakthroughs in Bioscience and Horizons in Bioscience series are available upon request. Please include the desired article, quantity and purpose for the publication's use with your inquiry.

How Biomedical Research Provides Fertility Hope to Cancer Survivors

Posted on: March 12, 2011

 

How Biomedical Research Provides Fertility Hope to Cancer Survivors - The process of reproduction has fascinated humans since ancient times. Hippocrates and Aristotle offered theories on conception and fertility, but it was not until the late 17th century that a Dutch scientist named Niels Stensen, who was studying the reproductive organs of animals, suggested that human ovaries might contain egg cells, or oocytes. Over a century later, this was definitively confirmed by one of the founding fathers of embryology, Carl Ernst von Baer.  Read more...


Viruses, Cancer, Warts and All: The HPV Vaccine for Cervical Cancer

Posted on: June 15, 2008

 

Viruses, Cancer, Warts and All: The HPV Vaccine for Cervical Cancer - The understanding that human papillomavirus (HPV) could cause cervical cancer was the result of decades of fundamental research on wart- and cancer-causing viruses, including the virus from which the legend of the jackalope arose, as well as the study of cervical histology.  Read more...
 


Breast Cancer, Tamoxifen & Beyond: Estrogen and Estrogen Receptors

Posted on: January 15, 2006

 

Breast Cancer, Tamoxifen & Beyond: Estrogen and Estrogen Receptors - Sheep and chickens prove important in breast cancer research. Ewes and hens served as crucial animal models in early studies to understand how estrogen worked and how it affected breast tumor development.  Read more...